Frequently Asked Questions

Can you, as a minister, visit my relative in prison?
That depends on each prison, the rules are different at each one, and it depends on how the inmate registered when he/she was incarcerated as to what religious denomination they belong. In some cases, if you are not of the same denomination, you will be denied visitation rights.

Do you have any training materials I can download?
Yes, we do. See the “Training” link in this web site’s navigation menu.

Does Florida Prison Ministries deal with prison ministry in Florida only?
No, we are here to assist volunteers in prison ministries around the country. Our work is focused in Florida, but we count it a privilege that our experience and training materials can help others in prison ministry.

Halfway houses are an additional expense in inmates getting out prison, why do we need them?
The expense is cheap compared to the possibility of the inmate not receiving the proper support that he/she needs in trying to rebuild their life as they return to society.

I don’t see any e-mail address with which to contact Florida Prison Ministries. Why?
We keep our e-mail address off the web site because automated spam robots scour the internet looking for exposed addresses. Having said that, you can get our e-mail address by asking for it. Just visit our Contact Us page.

I tried to send material to my relative. What did I do wrong?
The material going to most inmates in prison must come from the publisher or a reputable book store where the material has not been comprised.

What type of material can I send to the inmate?
No hardback books should be sent to inmates, as they are a source of contraband and weapons. Subscriptions from publishers can usually be submitted, but not pornography or any questionable material.

Who is the director of Florida Prison Ministries?
Frank Barton Sr. is the Chaplain/Director of Florida Prison Ministries.

Why aren’t there halfway houses closer to the families?
It is far better for the inmate to not even be remotely close to old friends in old situations. They need a new start with new friends and surroundings which will give them the support they need in building a community type relation.

Why do we need halfway houses?
Because it has been the experience over the years that if any inmate goes back to the area where they got into trouble, he/she is more likely to fall in with the same bad influences.

Why doesn’t someone visit my relative in prison?
Apologies, this answer was somehow lost in our new site migration—we will restore the answer ASAP